DNR fishing report: Area anglers going deep for salmon on Big Lake; Muskegon Lake still slow for salmon

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Inland lake fishing is still going strong. Stream trout fishing is good however few anglers are taking advantage of it. The salmon runs are just getting started in the northern sections of the Lower Peninsula. No big numbers yet but the fish were starting to move.

SOUTHWEST LOWER PENINSULA

Grand Haven: Salmon anglers are doing well in water 120 to 170 feet deep with downriggers at 90 to 150 feet along with green or green and white flies. Pier anglers have caught a couple coho when using alewife. No perch to report.

Muskegon: Salmon anglers are fishing 200 to 250 feet of water with downriggers set 140 to 200 feet. Use green or green and white flies as well as white UV paddles. Muskegon River: Is producing some nice smallmouth bass. Muskegon Lake: Anglers are starting to troll and jig for chinook salmon, but catch rates were hit-or-miss.

Whitehall:  Water temperatures warmed again which in turn makes it harder to find fish. A few anchored in 12 to 15 feet of water and were still-fishing with alewife. Others are getting out very early in the morning and fishing in 20 feet of water.


NORTHWEST LOWER PENINSULA

Manistee: Has very good fishing. Chinook were caught on meat rigs and plugs 40 to 100 feet down in 60 to 200 feet of water. Coho and steelhead were caught 25 to 50 feet down with red and orange spoons. Most fishing is still offshore, but a few fish are now being caught off the piers in the morning and evening. Try glow spoons.

Ludington:Has very good fishing. Anglers have done well from the Project to Big Sable Point when fishing 50 to 100 feet down in 70 to 240 feet of water with meat rigs and plugs. Pier anglers and those trolling around the piers reported slow catch rates as water temperatures warmed up. Those casting have caught a couple salmon in low light conditions.

Pentwater:  Fishing is the slowest it has been this year. Anglers say it is difficult to find water temperatures lower than 60’s degrees. Those using cut bait 65 feet down in 85 feet of water did mange to catch a few fish.

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